ABOUT ADAM

ABOUT ADAM GIDWITZ

Adam Gidwitz

I was born in San Francisco in 1982, but moved to Baltimore when I was two and a half. I grew up there, attending a school without very many rules. Somehow, I found a way to break all of them. I spent my entire middle school career in the principal's office. One day I will write a book and tell you about all of the ways you can be sent to the principal's office during middle school. Maybe each chapter will be a different way to be sent to the principal's office. There will be three hundred and forty-five thousand chapters.

I straightened myself out during high school and ended up going to college in New York City. I thought about majoring in religion, and then in philosophy, but ultimately chose English literature, because I think that the deepest truths about life tend to be written in works of fiction. Also, you can't beat the homework in English: "You’ll like this book! And this one! Try this book, it's amazing!"

I spent my third year of college in England. I walked around the old university town and ate beef pasties and sat in parks and read John Keats all day long. I only had to go to class twice a week, for an hour at a time. If you're any good at math, you'll know that that means I only had to be somewhere for two hours out of every 168. That means I was free to do whatever I wanted 166 out of every 168 hours, or 98.8% of the time. I didn't realize it then, but it was in that year that I discovered I could be a writer--me, a beef pasty, and my imagination is all I seem to need to be happy. (My wife tells me that this is untrue. I refuse to believe her.)

After graduating, I stayed in New York and took a job in a second grade classroom at Saint Ann’s School, in Brooklyn, while attending Bank Street College of Education in the evenings. So during the days I was telling stories to kids at lunch and recess and story time, and at night I was meeting writers and reading bags full of children's books and thinking about how it all went together. Eventually, I taught first, second, fifth, and high school at Saint Ann's.

I spent most of 2012 living in France with my wife, who studies monks in the middle ages. Now, we’re back in Brooklyn. I’m writing most of the time, and traveling around the US, visiting schools, the rest of the time. Want to find me? Click here!

Now that you know all about me, ask me a question!

 

I was born in San Francisco in 1982, but moved to Baltimore when I was two and a half. I grew up there, attending a school without very many rules. Somehow, I found a way to break all of them. I spent my entire middle school career in the principal's office. One day I will write a book and tell you about all of the ways you can be sent to the principal's office during middle school. Maybe each chapter will be a different way to be sent to the principal's office. There will be three hundred and forty-five thousand chapters.

I straightened myself out during high school and ended up going to college in New York City. I thought about majoring in religion, and then in philosophy, but ultimately chose English literature, because I think that the deepest truths about life tend to be written in works of fiction. Also, you can't beat the homework in English: "You’ll like this book! And this one! Try this book, it's amazing!"
 
I spent my third year of college in England. I walked around the old university town and ate beef pasties and sat in parks and read John Keats all day long. I only had to go to class twice a week, for an hour at a time. If you're any good at math, you'll know that that means I only had to be somewhere for two hours out of every 168. That means I was free to do whatever I wanted 166 out of every 168 hours, or 98.8% of the time. I didn't realize it then, but it was in that year that I discovered I could be a writer--me, a beef pasty, and my imagination is all I seem to need to be happy. (My wife tells me that this is untrue. I refuse to believe her.)
 
After graduating, I stayed in New York and took a job in a second grade classroom at Saint Ann’s School, in Brooklyn, while attending Bank Street College of Education in the evenings. So during the days I was telling stories to kids at lunch and recess and story time, and at night I was meeting writers and reading bags full of children's books and thinking about how it all went together. Eventually, I taught first, second, fifth, and high school at Saint Ann's.

I spent most of 2012 living in France with my wife, who studies monks in the middle ages. Now, we’re back in Brooklyn. I’m writing most of the time, and traveling around the US, visiting schools, the rest of the time. Want to find me? Click here!

Want to know more about me, my life, or A Tale Dark and Grimm? Ask me a question here!